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Wicked Good Travel Tips / Featured  / Spooky Charleston Ghost Tours Get a Thrill and a Chill
2 May

Spooky Charleston Ghost Tours Get a Thrill and a Chill

Why do we love to go on ghost tours?  Believe it or not, people like to be scared. That’s why we read (and like to listen to) ghost stories and scary books, watch scary movies, and seek out experiences that we hope will make the little hairs on the backs of our necks stand up. It’s no wonder then that we spend so much time seeking out haunted places and why haunted tours and tourist destinations are some of the most popular places to visit.

Charlotte Ghost Tours

Deliciously creepy, eh?

If you love to be scared and to visit haunted places, you must plan a trip to Charleston, South Carolina. Charleston is considered by many to be the most haunted city in the United States. So once you’ve made it to the city, here are the best haunted ghost tours to take.

The Battery Carriage House Inn

The Battery Carriage House Inn is the most haunted inn in Charleston. The two most often seen and talked about ghosts are the Headless Torso (who is decidedly not a friendly spirit, according to accounts) and the Gentleman Ghost a fairly benign ghost of a young man who, according to rumors, committed suicide by leaping off of the roof in the early 20th century.

Guests at the hotel have also reported everything from things that could simply be consequences of the house’s age (dripping faucets, etc.) to things that are just…weird: ephemeral “firefly” light, apparitions, orbs, etc.

Folly Island

Folly Island is the home to many spirits of pirates and from the Civil War. The most famous ghost people have reported here is Blackbeard.

The lighthouse (the last remnant of Morris Island) is a particularly good place for ghost sightings—some of them appearing so lifelike that people have called the local authorities, fearing that actual people are trapped inside the lighthouse!

The Battery

The Battery is an area of Charleston and the grove of oak trees nearby was the site of many pirate hangings, back when pirates used to threaten the city on a regular basis. Today, visitors to the Battery and the oak trees report ghosts of pirates jumping out and screaming at them. There are also lots of civil war-era ghosts hanging out in this area (according to reports).

Probably not a place you’d want to explore alone! Especially after dark!

Church Street

Across from the entrance to Battery Park (where the oak trees are) is Church Street, thought by many to be the most ghost and spirit “infected” area of the city. This is where most of the human trafficking from the slave trade took place when that was still going on as well as some pretty heavy action during the Civil War.

Bull Dog Tours

Charlotte Pirates Courtyard

Bull Dog Tours is the only walking tour that is allowed to leave the city’s sidewalks at night. Tour members will be taken through the Unitarian Church Graveyard (the oldest cemetery in Charleston), where many ghosts have appeared and been mistaken for fellow tour members.

They’ll also get to tour the Old Exchange Building and Provost Dungeon—where quite a few pirates were jailed for their crimes. The most famous pirate to spend time here was Blackbeard. The north side of the building was the site of a slave market, and visitors to the city have reported seeing purple lights in the sky above it at night.

If you love to be scared and are hoping to get a look at a ghost or two, Charleston should definitely be on your list. So much happened here that experts from all over have testified to the level of spiritual and ephemeral energy and activity within this city. If you’re an avid haunting hunter, it’s a must-visit.

Have fun!

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About The Author:  Erin Steiner is a freelance writer from Portland, Oregon, and has written about a variety of topics including but not limited to Spokeo removal and reputation management and has thoroughly creeped herself out while doing the research for this article.
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